K&W Dental
 
Dental Implants

Overview

There are now more options to replace missing teeth and one that is gaining in popularity and use is the dental implant. The implant is usually made of titanium and is surgically placed by a dental implant specialist such as a periodontist. These screw-like parts are placed into the jawbone and are meant to imitate the root of the tooth.

Dental implant placement usually involves the following steps:

  1. Initial consultation: Your implant dentist will thoroughly examine your mouth, including taking X-rays or 3D images, discuss the various implant options and develop a plan for your implant surgery.

  2. Dental implant placement: At your next scheduled appointment, your implant dentist will place the dental implant in your jawbone where your tooth is missing. Although each patient’s experience is unique, most people find they experience less pain and discomfort than they expect, and typically return to work the next day.  Post-implant surgery discomfort is similar to that of any other dental surgery. It may include swelling, bruising, minor bleeding and/or pain, but most patients usually manage any pain with over-the-counter medications.

  3. Osseointegration: As you heal, your implant and jawbone will grow together in a process called osseointegration, forming a strong, long-lasting foundation for your replacement teeth. During this healing process, which can take up to a few months, you go on with your normal life. You will be on a soft food diet for the first few weeks to make sure your implants heal properly. In some cases, your implant dentist may also be able to place temporary teeth during this period, if you choose.

  4. Abutment placement: Once your implant bonds with your jawbone, a small connector – called an abutment – is placed on the dental implant just above the gumline. In some cases, the abutment can be placed at the same time as the implant.

  5. Custom-make and attach new teeth: After your gums heal, your dental implant dentist will make impressions of your mouth and remaining teeth to custom-make your artificial teeth. These teeth – which can be an individual crown, implant-supported bridge or dentures containing multiple replacement teeth – will be attached to the abutment. Although they don’t decay, your new teeth will need the same routine care, checkups and cleanings as your natural teeth.

  6. Periodic check ups: Depending on the number and type of implants and replacement teeth you receive, the entire process can take three to nine months. After your dental implant placement is finished, you’ll visit your dental implant dentist periodically for follow-up checkups, just as you do your regular dentist. 

Surgery Preparation

Your dentist may provide you with some pre-operative instructions to follow. These may include:

  • Having you rinse with a special anti-bacterial mouthwash, such as chlorhexidine.

  • Prescribing antibiotics to take for a few days prior to surgery as a preventative measure.

Potential Complications

  • Infection around the surrounding bone and gums

  • Your body's rejection of the dental implant

  • Bone loss around the dental implant

  • Your dental implant may fail to adhere to the bone

  • Persistent numbness/altered sensation

  • Sinus complications